Tummy treats

I never thought I’d be so full from just a salad.

In fact, last night, I made fun of someone for being full from just a salad.

Damnit, karma.

After rolling myself home from a scrumptious, fun, and well, fibrous dinner at Live Food Bar, I wanted something to settle my stomach a little: I had a hankering for a ginger ale… One without sugar. Or ale.

Tongue, meet stevia. Mmmm. Sweet, refreshing success. Stevia is great because it doesn’t spike your blood sugar and send you into some foggy-headed, sugary abyss. Plus it has no calories, and contains no sugar. So far, so good.

Ginger is nice and soothing for an upset stomach. I have a hankering that’s why they serve it at all-you-can-eat sushi joints..

Mint Ginger-Ade 

(sugar-free, everything else-free)

Ingredients:

A few sprigs of mint

A thumb of grated ginger (I usually just grate and freeze little bits of it)

Juice of one lime

A few drops of stevia, to taste

Sparkling water

Directions:

Like you’re making a mojito, muddle the mint, ginger, lime, and stevia. Squish ’em up real nice. Pour in your sparkling water, and let it soak up the flavours. Stir. Strain into a glass with a few ice cubes, and slurp up the refreshment!

Last time I make fun of someone for eating a salad. Sorry, Reens. 😛

Oh, and remember my little soup dilemna? Problem solved overnight—and I didn’t have to put in any effort. That’s just what soup does. So thanks for having my back, soup.

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the “controversy” series #1: agave nectar

Hiking up in the hills of Sedona last weekend, we came across many agave plants—finally, something in this damn desert I recognized, since their nectar has recently emerged as a wholesome sweetener, a healthy alternative to high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and granulated sugars. And it, too, has recently become a part of my diet, a much better substitute for sweetener in drinks and recipes… or so I thought.

An agave plant in full bloom on the climb up Sugarloaf Mountain, Sedona, Arizona.

I expressed my fascination with the plant to our trail guide (a certified nautropath!), but she didn’t share my enthusiasm, muttering something about how it was just as bad, or worse yet than any of the other liquidy sugars out there. Uh-oh.

Though I didn’t get a chance to pick her brain, I did want to check it out when I got home (admittedly, mum and I have been DUMPING the stuff into homemade iced tea to replenish electrolytes and stay buzzed.. er, awake for afternoon lectures at yoga teacher training). I’d envisioned myself maybe doing a posting on the controversy of the stuff (and continuing to sip it!), but unfortunately what I’ve found proves otherwise.

It appears there’s no argument.. this shit ain’t better for you, in fact, it’s worse! So who told everyone this stuff was healthy in the first place??

Well, for one, lots of bakeries have begun to substitute this “healthy alternative” to sweeten up little morsels of deliciousness. Further, nice-r coffee and tea shops are starting to include it next to the brown sugar and honey. But worst of all, a lot of the health-food recipes I’ve come across fully support and encourage the use of this nectar—and with reason—it is stereotypical vegan alternative to honey. So it’s understandable for me to think I’ve found my savior of sweetners. But now, all of this information makes me wonder—is it really better than just plain ol’, natural sugar?

While I can’t claim to have done any of the scientific research myself, a little internet perusing leads me to believe it just ain’t. Foodrenegade seems to make the best argument against it (though if you do a little searching yourself you’ll find some pretty similar answer):

Agave “nectar” is not made from the sap of the yucca or agave plant but from the starch of the giant pineapple-like, root bulb. The principal constituent of the agave root is starch, similar to the starch in corn or rice, and a complex carbohydrate called inulin, which is made up of chains of fructose molecules.Technically a highly indigestible fiber, inulin, which does not taste sweet, comprises about half of the carbohydrate content of agave.

The process by which agave glucose and inulin are converted into “nectar” is similar to the process by which corn starch is converted into HFCS. The agave starch is subject to an enzymatic and chemical process that converts the starch into a fructose-rich syrup—anywhere from 70 percent fructose and higher according to the agave nectar chemical profiles posted on agave nectar websites.

Agave nectar is not traditional, is highly refined, and actually has more concentrated fructose than high-fructose corn syrup. It is not a “natural” sweetener. Thus far, the evidence definitely points toward the conclusion: Agave Nectar = Bad.

There it goes down the rabbit-food hole, another health nut’s dream of finding some guilt-free substance that we can load on our toast and pancakes without shame or limitation. Sigh—isn’t that the point anyway? Moderation? Taking sugars down a notch or two in general? Maybe I won’t throw out the nectar just yet… I’ll just have to avoid drizzlling (is that a word?) that sweet, sweet nectar like it came from the gods.

The best alternative, then? Stay tuned….

I used to think Toxicity was just a cool name for a SOAD album…

Not-so-breaking news—it’s not new, but it’s never really recognized. It needs rehab like drugs and alcohol. It’s probably more addictive than crack. But of course, no one’s gonna tell you that. They’re too busy sucking at the teets of high-fructose corn syrup themselves.

The number one thing I learned from my cleanse? I’m addicted to sugar, too. I crave it constantly, especially with certain triggers, like after meals, or when I’m nearing the end of a long shift at work. And no wonder. It’s rewired my body to need more and more of it.

Refined sugar and [high fructose corn syrup] don’t come with any protein, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants or fiber, and so they either displace other more nutritious elements of our diet or are eaten over and above what we need to sustain our weight..

The fructose component of sugar and H.F.C.S. is metabolized primarily by the liver, while the glucose from sugar and starches is metabolized by every cell in the body. Consuming sugar (fructose and glucose) means more work for the liver than if you consumed the same number of calories of starch (glucose). And if you take that sugar in liquid form — soda or fruit juices — the fructose and glucose will hit the liver more quickly than if you consume them, say, in an apple (or several apples, to get what researchers would call the equivalent dose of sugar).

In animals, or at least in laboratory rats and mice, it’s clear that if the fructose hits the liver in sufficient quantity and with sufficient speed, the liver will convert much of it to fat. This apparently induces a condition known as insulin resistance, which is now considered the fundamental problem in obesity, and the underlying defect in heart disease and in the type of diabetes, type 2, that is common to obese and overweight individuals. It might also be the underlying defect in many cancers.

Sugar’s more than just empty calories—it’s worse. In short, sugar is one of the most toxic things you can put in your body—but avoiding it isn’t just a chore, it’s an entire lifestyle overhaul. At 90+ pounds per person per year of sugar according to the US FDA? That’s a problem. This isn’t made to send you into a panic and pantry dump—but perhaps, to help with more conscious decisions. I used to skip dinners because I’d rather eat a bowl of ice cream or a bag of candy—I thought, at least, it balances everything out calorie-wise. That’s true, but in doing so, not only do I rob myself of nutrients that I could be eating, it now appears that I was replacing them with some real toxic stuff. Scary.

In the New York Times: Is Sugar Toxic?

**Disclaimer: Do NOT expect me to turn down, nor stop offering me cake at your birthday post-this-post. Special occasions are a-okay.